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Police measures against COVID-19 in Denmark

Frequently asked questions and answers from Danish National Police about the Danish Government's efforts to limit the spread of the coronavirus.

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See Controlled reopening of Denmark

 

As part of the efforts to limit the spread of the novel coronavirus in Denmark, the Government and the authorities have taken a number of measures to reduce social contact, maintain social distancing and increase the effect of social distancing.

 

The ban applies from 18 March until 8 June 2020.

 

This Q&A has been updated in comparison with the first elements of the agreement on additional reopening under phase two set out in the agreement of the controlled reopening, which commenced on 20 May 2020.

 

For the measures to be effective in battling COVID-19 in Denmark, every single citizen must take responsibility for reducing social contact and maintaining social distancing. This also applies among family and friends.

 

Fines imposed for violation of restrictions during the COVID-19 outbreak (in Danish)

Ban on events and gatherings with more than 10 participants

Yes. Events, activities etc. with more than 10 participants are banned. This ban applies to both indoor and outdoor gatherings, and it applies to both public and private events etc.

 

Few exemptions have been made, including for private homes.

 

The ban applies from 18 March 2020 until at least 8 June 2020.

No. The ban does not apply to private homes and adjacent gardens. However, courtyards and the like which are at the disposal of residents from a large number of homes are excepted and still fall within the scope of the ban.

Although the ban does not apply to homes and adjacent gardens, residents are urged to cancel private gatherings or events for more than 10 participants and to observe the health authorities' general recommendations on good hygiene, social distancing and appropriate conduct.

Basically yes. However, despite the ban, more than 10 people can go to a shop, a supermarket, an airport, a train station or the like and move around as usual.

 

The use of public transport (trains, busses, aeroplanes, ferries etc.) and ordinary physical presence at a workplace are not banned either. 

 

Please note that the Executive Order on the Maximum Seat Occupancy Rate in Intercity Buses as a Means of Controlling COVID-19 which provides that intercity buses cannot at any time carry more passengers than half their number of seats was repealed on Monday, 18 May 2020.

 

In general, people are urged to observe the health authorities' general recommendations on good hygiene, social distancing and appropriate conduct.

 
 
 

Yes. The police have been authorised to interfere at public places if more than 10 people have gathered at the same location in a way that constitutes a particular risk of infection with the novel coronavirus.

 

The police have discretionary powers to issue directions pursuant to the health authorities' general recommendations to reduce social contact and maintain social distancing.

The police can order people to leave the place.

This applies from 18 March 2020 until 8 June 2020.

 
 

 

 
 

Yes. The police can issue a temporary ban on loitering at certain locations with public access if it is the assessment of the police that a ban must be issued to reduce the spread of COVID-19 and a dispersal order is deemed insufficient to prevent the risk of infection. Such locations could be parks or playgrounds. 

A ban on loitering means that loitering at the location is illegal. However, people can still move around in the area if it is an ordinary activity at the relevant location, such as a walk.  

A ban on loitering can be issued for a period of up to seven days and can subsequently be extended. Such ban must be displayed on signs and on the website of the police. 

 
 
 
No. The ban on events etc. with more than 10 participants does not apply to political or other opinion-shaping gatherings.

No. Police districts cannot give prior approval of events, activities etc., except for prior approval of drive-in events.

 

Police districts can only advise Danish citizens that the police will enforce the rules of the Executive Order. Police districts can also advise Danish citizens to look at Coronavirus/COVID-19 in Denmark for further information or to call one of the call centres.

No. No curfew has been imposed. However, the police can order people to leave a place if there are more than 10 people and the police find that they have gathered in a way that constitutes a particular risk of infection with the novel coronavirus.

 

When exercising its discretionary right, the police must take into account the Danish Health Authority 's general recommendations concerning the risk of infection with the novel coronavirus.

No requirement of social distancing has been made in relation to political or other opinion-shaping gatherings, and accordingly it is not possible to dissolve such gatherings due to the risk of infection with the novel coronavirus. 

 

Political or other opinion-shaping gatherings are, however, urged to follow the health authorities' general recommendations to maintain social distancing and avoid physical contact with other people.

 
 
No. The rules do not apply to public and private hospitals and clinics nor to private clinics run by authorised healthcare professionals or at which authorised healthcare professionals are employed.

Yes. At a public playground, the police can issue a dispersal order if more than 10 people have gathered at the location in a way that is considered by the police to constitute a particular risk of infection with the novel coronavirus.

 

The police have discretionary powers to issue directions pursuant to the health authorities' general recommendations to reduce social contact and maintain social distancing. 

If a dispersal order is deemed insufficient, the police can also issue a temporary ban on loitering at the location.

This applies from 18 March 2020 until 8 June 2020.

 
 
 

It depends on the specific circumstances whether market days, flea markets etc. are allowed. 

If the market days or markets are usually held weekly or at other regular intervals and local traders, farmers etc. sell their produce/goods from separate stalls at a market or the like comparable to shops in a pedestrian street, such activity is normally allowed. However, if there are other activities in addition to the stalls on market days, at marketplaces etc., such as music performances or other stage performances, the market falls within the scope of the ban.

If the markets are isolated events, such as annual markets like flea markets, and if a wide or non-specified group of people are allowed to put up different kinds of stalls, such stalls would normally fall within the scope of the ban, and therefore such markets are not allowed. 

The police can issue a dispersal order if more than 10 people have gathered at the location in a way that is considered by the police to constitute a particular risk of infection with the novel coronavirus. 

If a dispersal order is deemed insufficient, the police can also issue a temporary ban on loitering at the location.

The police urge people to observe the health authorities' general recommendations on good hygiene, social distancing and appropriate conduct.

 
 
 

No. The ban does not apply to regular use of public transport. More than 10 people can therefore be in a train or bus, on a ferry etc. at the same time. Passengers can also wait for a train at the station or at a bus stop even though there are more than 10 people present. 

Even though it is not prohibited for more than 10 people to be at the same location, the police can issue a dispersal order if the police deem that there is a particular risk of infection with novel coronavirus.

Please note that the Executive Order on the Maximum Seat Occupancy Rate in Intercity Buses as a Means of Controlling COVID-19 which provides that intercity buses cannot at any time carry more passengers than half their number of seats was repealed on Monday, 18 May 2020.

The National Police urge people to observe the health authorities' general recommendations on good hygiene, social distancing and appropriate conduct. 

 
 

Yes. The ban on hosting and attending indoor and outdoor events, activities etc. with more than 10 participants does not apply to private homes.
A private home can be both a person's permanent home and a person's leisure home, whether the property is owned or rented.

However, the police strongly urge people to observe the health authorities' general recommendations on good hygiene, social distancing and appropriate conduct.

If a summerhouse is rented solely for the purpose of hosting a party or another event and the summerhouse thereby assumes the nature of a village hall or a function room, it might be determined due to the specific circumstances that the party or event is not allowed because the summerhouse is no longer in the nature of a 'home'. It will be taken into account whether the summerhouse has been rented/used solely for a weekend stay, whether the tenant only stays in the summerhouse to prepare and host the party, whether the party is organised by a professional event maker etc.
Yes. People living in flats, detached houses or similar residential buildings with access to shared outdoor areas are normally not required to watch out for the number of people present to make sure that there are no more than 10 people using the area at the same time. However, citizens are strongly urged not to gather in groups of more than 10 people, to generally reduce the size of groups as much as possible and to observe the health authorities' general recommendations on good hygiene, social distancing and appropriate conduct.

The ban on hosting and attending indoor and outdoor events, activities etc. with more than 10 participants also applies to courtyards and the like which are at the disposal of residents from a large number of homes.

The police can issue a dispersal order if more than 10 people have gathered in the shared outdoor area in a way that is considered by the police to constitute a particular risk of infection with the novel coronavirus. The police have discretionary powers to issue directions pursuant to the health authorities' general recommendations to reduce social contact and maintain social distancing.

If a dispersal order is deemed insufficient, the police can also issue a temporary ban on loitering at the location.

It depends on an assessment of the specific circumstances. If the distribution or sale is in the nature of a pre-announced event etc. and there are more than 10 people present, the distribution or sale falls within the scope of the ban.

 

Accordingly, it would be illegal to organise and attend an event announced on the social media involving the distribution of food or drinks for free if it is considered to be an event and if more than 10 people have gathered.

 

If the distribution or sale is not in the nature of an event etc., the directions for ordinary sales must be observed, which includes that natural and legal persons must:

 

  • Ensure a free floor area of at least four square metres for each customer, guest or visitor. However, establishments selling food, drinks or tobacco for consumption on-site may allow one customer, guest or visitor for each two square metres of floor area unless the establishment has been designed mainly for standing guests.
  • Ensure that all employees and other persons admitted to the premises observe the Danish Health Authority's recommendations on good hygiene and appropriate conduct.
  • Display information posters telling people with symptoms of COVID-19 to isolate themselves at home.
  • Display information posters on good hygiene and appropriate conduct in public spaces.
  • Make water and soap and/or hand sanitizer (with an alcohol concentration of at least 70%) available to customers, guests and visitors to the extent possible.
  • Ensure that employees and other persons admitted to the premises use gloves when selling and delivering non-wrapped food if they touch the food with their hands.
  • Change the layout of premises to ensure social distancing between customers, guests and visitors – also at checkouts.

The police have also been authorised to interfere at public places if more than 10 people have gathered at the same location in a way that constitutes a particular risk of infection with the novel coronavirus, for example a pick-up queue. The police have discretionary powers to issue directions pursuant to the health authorities' general recommendations to reduce social contact and maintain social distancing.

Parties at a function room, a restaurant or the like with more than 10 participants are not allowed as such a party would fall within the scope of the ban on hosting and attending indoor and outdoor events, activities etc. with more than 10 participants. 

Parties with more than 10 participants cannot be made lawful by dividing the participants into smaller groups of no more than 10 people at the same location, such as the same restaurant, village hall or common house, not even if the small groups keep their distance. The reason is that the individual(s) at the centre of the celebration, such as the bride and groom or the person celebrating his or her birthday, are the same for all small groups, and therefore it continues to be one single event with more than 10 participants. 

Accordingly, an event with more than 10 participants will not become lawful even though it is relocated to a restaurant designed in accordance with the directions.

 

The ban does not apply to private homes and adjacent gardens, but courtyards and the like which are at the disposal of residents from a large number of homes still fall within the scope of the ban. The National Police urge people to observe the health authorities' general recommendations on good hygiene, social distancing and appropriate conduct.

 
 

Yes. The letting of function rooms as such is not banned.

However, indoor and outdoor events, activities etc. with more than 10 participants are banned.

 
 
 

No.  Court hearings do not fall within the scope of the Executive Order. 

However, the National Police urge people to observe the health authorities' general recommendations on good hygiene, social distancing and appropriate conduct.

 
 
 

 

 

No. The emergency childcare and the emergency education programmes set up by day-care facilities, institutions, schools etc. do not fall within the scope of the ban.

 

This also applies to activities organised outside the premises or locations usually at the disposal of the day-care facilities, institutions, schools etc. 

However, parents must be aware that the ban on gatherings still applies when children are dropped off and picked up.

 
 

Ordinary physical presence at a workplace is allowed. However, it is the assessment of the National Police that movie shootings in public spaces cannot be deemed to be 'ordinary physical presence' at the TV or film producers' workplace. The shooting of TV programmes/movies is therefore normally considered events/activities that fall within the scope of the ban on gatherings of more than 10 people. However, it depends on the specific circumstances in each individual case. 

 
Enforcement and sanctions

The police can apply the necessary force as defined in the Police Act to enforce the ban on gatherings of more than 10 people in connection with indoor or outdoor events etc.

 

Moreover, fines can be issued for violation of a ban or an order issued in pursuance of the Executive Order.

 

Any owner of a business like a fitness studio or a cinema who does not observe the requirement to keep his or her premises closed to the public may be liable to a fine.

Moreover, a natural or legal person who is not required to keep his/her/its premises closed to the public may be liable to a fine if s/he does not follow the rules requiring him/her/it to:

 

  • Ensure a free floor area of at least two square metres for each guest or visitor. However, establishments designed mainly for standing guests must ensure a free floor area of at least four square metres for each person. This applies to establishments such as bars having only a limited number of seats relative to the number of guests. One person for each two square metres of floor area can be allowed access to cultural events at premises with a seated audience.
  • Ensure that all employees and other persons admitted to the premises observe the Danish Health Authority's recommendations on good hygiene and appropriate conduct.
  • Display information posters telling people with symptoms of COVID-19 to isolate themselves at home.
  • Display information posters on good hygiene and appropriate conduct in public spaces.
  • Make water and soap and/or hand sanitizer (with an alcohol concentration of at least 70%) available to guests and visitors to the extent possible.
  • Ensure that employees and other persons admitted to the premises use gloves when selling and delivering non-wrapped food if they touch the food with their hands.
  • Ensure that the layout of the premises is designed as far as possible to minimise the risk of infection, including that it must be possible for guests and visitors to maintain social distance – also at checkouts. 

The ban on staying open from midnight to 5 am, except for takeaway food and drinks, applies from 18 May 2020 until at least 8 June 2020.

The Ministry of Industry, Business and Financial Affairs (Erhvervsministeriet) has collaborated with the relevant authorities, business and industry and the labour market parties to prepare guidelines for a careful layout of restaurants, cafes, amusement parks, hotels, holiday resorts etc. in light of the outbreak of COVID-19. The recommended guidelines have been uploaded to virksomhedsguiden.dk.

The police can impose a fine on a person for not following the directions to leave a place, and the police can apply force to remove persons from a place, if necessary.

No. The police can only order natural and legal persons to keep certain premises closed to the public.

 

A 'natural or legal person' is the owner of the relevant business/shop, but not the paid staff members. Accordingly, only the owner of the relevant business/shop can be punished for not observing the requirement to keep certain premises closed, not the paid staff members. 

 
Nightclubs, bars, restaurants, and gambling arcades

Yes. Establishments selling food, drinks or tobacco for consumption on-site may stay open from 5 am to midnight. This applies to both indoor and outdoor areas. 

Establishments selling food, drinks or tobacco for consumption on-site comprise dining places such as restaurants and cafes, bars such as wine bars, cocktail bars and pubs, and places like hookah cafes.

Such establishments must stay closed from midnight to 5 am. This applies to both indoor and outdoor areas. However, restaurants and cafes etc. can sell takeaway food and drinks from midnight to 5 am if they have the requisite licences under other relevant legislation, but during that period they cannot make their outdoor seating areas available to guests who want to consume food or drinks sold by the relevant restaurant or cafe. Restaurants and cafes cannot be required to remove tables and chairs in their outdoor seating areas from midnight to 5 am, but if an owner does not arrange the removal of tables and chairs or rope off or otherwise seal off the area, the owner must display signs saying that eating, drinking and smoking is prohibited at the tables of the restaurant/cafe during that period. 
 
If guests of a restaurant or cafe use the outdoor seating area of another establishment between midnight and 5 am to consume food and/or drinks purchased at the restaurant or cafe, it might be determined due to the specific circumstances that the restaurant etc. has the outdoor seating area of another establishment at its disposal. That might be the case if the two establishments have agreed so, or it is otherwise obvious that an establishment attempts to circumvent the ban by having the outdoor seating area of another establishment at its disposal, for example if the restaurant advises its guest to use the outdoor seating area of another establishment. 
 
All establishments selling food, drinks or tobacco for consumption on-site, that is, all restaurants, cafes, bars etc., and all restaurants and cafes selling takeaway food and drinks must observe the following directions at their premises:

 

  • Ensure a free floor area of at least two square metres for each guest or visitor. However, establishments designed mainly for standing guests must ensure a free floor area of at least four square metres for each person. This applies to establishments such as bars having only a limited number of seats relative to the number of guests.
  • Ensure that all employees and other persons admitted to the premises observe the Danish Health Authority's recommendations on good hygiene and appropriate conduct.
  • Display information posters telling people with symptoms of COVID-19 to isolate themselves at home.
  • Display information posters on good hygiene and appropriate conduct in public spaces. 
  • Make water and soap and/or hand sanitizer (with an alcohol concentration of at least 70%) available to guests and visitors to the extent possible. 
  • Ensure that employees and other persons admitted to the premises use gloves when selling and delivering non-wrapped food if they touch the food with their hands. 
  • Ensure that the layout of the premises is designed as far as possible to minimise the risk of infection, including that it must be possible for guests and visitors to maintain social distance – also at checkouts. 

The ban on staying open from midnight to 5 am, except for takeaway food and drinks, applies from 18 May 2020 until at least 8 June 2020.

The Ministry of Industry, Business and Financial Affairs (Erhvervsministeriet) has collaborated with the relevant authorities, business and industry and the labour market parties to prepare guidelines for a careful layout of restaurants, cafes, amusement parks, hotels, holiday resorts etc. in light of the outbreak of COVID-19. The recommended guidelines have been uploaded to www.em.dk

 

Yes. Pubs, wine bars, cocktail bars etc. are allowed to stay open from 5 am to midnight.

 

If they stay open, they must:

 

  • Ensure a free floor area of at least two square metres for each guest or visitor. However, establishments designed mainly for standing guests must ensure a free floor area of at least four square metres for each person. This applies to establishments such as bars having only a limited number of seats relative to the number of guests. One person for each two square metres of floor area can be allowed access to cultural events at premises with a seated audience.
  • Ensure that all employees and other persons admitted to the premises observe the Danish Health Authority's recommendations on good hygiene and appropriate conduct.
  • Display information posters telling people with symptoms of COVID-19 to isolate themselves at home.
  • Display information posters on good hygiene and appropriate conduct in public spaces.
  • Make water and soap and/or hand sanitizer (with an alcohol concentration of at least 70%) available to guests and visitors to the extent possible.
  • Ensure that employees and other persons admitted to the premises use gloves when selling and delivering non-wrapped food if they touch the food with their hands.
  • Ensure that the layout of the premises is designed as far as possible to minimise the risk of infection, including that it must be possible for guests and visitors to maintain social distance – also at checkouts.

Discotheques, nightclubs and the like must still stay closed. In the assessment of whether a venue is a discotheque, a nightclub or the like falling within the scope of the temporary ban, it must be taken into account whether there are only few seats, whether there is a dance floor, whether its principal activity is not the sale of food and whether it has been granted a licence for extended opening hours. However, it is irrelevant for this assessment whether or not it is called a discotheque.

 

Following an assessment of the specific circumstances, a bar with only few seats, a dance floor, no sale of food and usually late-night opening hours may therefore fall within the scope of the temporary ban, whereas in light of the circumstances, a nightclub that puts chairs and tables on the dance floor and otherwise rearranges the premises to resemble a more traditional bar may open. If the venue opens, the above requirements must be observed.

 

The temporary ban on staying open applies from 18 May 2020 until at least 8 June 2020.

 

The Ministry of Industry, Business and Financial Affairs (Erhvervsministeriet) has collaborated with the relevant authorities, business and industry and the labour market parties to prepare guidelines for a careful layout of restaurants, cafes, amusement parks, hotels, holiday resorts etc. in light of the outbreak of COVID-19. The recommended guidelines have been uploaded to virksomhedsguiden.dk.

No. Discotheques, nightclubs and the like must still stay closed.

In the assessment of whether a venue is a discotheque, a nightclub or the like falling within the scope of the temporary ban, it must be taken into account whether there are only few seats, whether there is a dance floor, whether its principal activity is not the sale of food and whether it has been granted a licence for extended opening hours. However, it is irrelevant for this assessment whether or not it is called a discotheque. 

Following an assessment of the specific circumstances, a bar with only few seats, a dance floor, no sale of food and usually late-night opening hours may therefore fall within the scope of the temporary ban, whereas in light of the circumstances, a nightclub that puts chairs and tables on the dance floor and otherwise rearranges the premises to resemble a more traditional bar may open. If the venue opens, the above requirements must be observed. 

Music venues fall within the temporary ban on staying open.

The temporary ban on staying open applies from 18 May 2020 until at least 8 June 2020.

The Ministry of Industry, Business and Financial Affairs (Erhvervsministeriet) has collaborated with the relevant authorities, business and industry and the labour market parties to prepare guidelines for a careful layout of restaurants, cafes, amusement parks, hotels, holiday resorts etc. in light of the outbreak of COVID-19. The recommended guidelines have been uploaded to virksomhedsguiden.dk.

Music venues with a seated audience can stay open. However, a maximum of 500 participants can be allowed access to the music venue.

 

If they stay open, they must:

 

  • Ensure a free floor area of at least four square metres for each guest or visitor. However, establishments selling food, drinks or tobacco for consumption on-site may allow one guest or visitor for each two square metres of floor area unless the establishment has been designed mainly for standing guests. This applies to establishments such as bars having only a limited number of seats relative to the number of guests. One person for each two square metres of floor area can be allowed access to cultural events at premises with a seated audience.
  • Ensure that all employees and other persons admitted to the premises observe the Danish Health Authority's recommendations on good hygiene and appropriate conduct.
  • Display information posters telling people with symptoms of COVID-19 to isolate themselves at home.
  • Display information posters on good hygiene and appropriate conduct in public spaces.
  • Make water and soap and/or hand sanitizer (with an alcohol concentration of at least 70%) available to guests and visitors to the extent possible.
  • Ensure that employees and other persons admitted to the premises use gloves when selling and delivering non-wrapped food if they touch the food with their hands.
  • Ensure that the layout of the premises is designed as far as possible to minimise the risk of infection, including that it must be possible for guests and visitors to maintain social distance – also at checkouts.

Music venues with a standing audience still fall within the scope of the temporary ban on staying open.

A gambling arcade is a room in which you gamble for money, for example on slot machines.

 

Natural and legal persons must therefore keep gambling arcades closed to the public.

Kiosks are allowed to stay open, but not any adjacent gambling arcades.

All establishments selling food must normally stay closed from midnight to 5 am. This applies to both indoor and outdoor areas.

However, sausage stands, shawarma restaurants, pizzerias etc. can sell takeaway food and drinks from midnight to 5 am if they have the requisite licences under other relevant legislation, but during that period they cannot make their outdoor seating areas available to guests who want to consume food or drinks sold by the relevant sausage stands, shawarma restaurants, pizzerias etc. Sausage stands, shawarma restaurants, pizzerias etc. cannot be required to remove tables and chairs in their outdoor seating areas from midnight to 5 am, but if an owner does not arrange the removal of tables and chairs or rope off or otherwise seal off the area, the owner must display signs saying that eating, drinking and smoking is prohibited at the tables of the sausage stand, shawarma restaurant, pizzeria etc. during that period.

If guests of a sausage stand, shawarma restaurant, pizzeria etc. use the outdoor seating area of another establishment between midnight and 5 am to consume food and/or drinks purchased at the sausage stand, shawarma restaurant, pizzeria etc., it might be determined due to the specific circumstances that the restaurant etc. has the outdoor seating area of another establishment at its disposal. That might be the case if the two establishments have agreed so, or it is otherwise obvious that an establishment attempts to circumvent the ban by having the outdoor seating area of another establishment at its disposal, for example if the sausage stand, shawarma restaurant, pizzeria etc. advises its guest to use the outdoor seating area of another establishment.

All sausage stands, shawarma restaurants, pizzerias etc. selling takeaway food and drinks must observe the following directions at their premises:

 

  • Ensure a free floor area of at least four square metres for each customer., guest or visitor.
  • Ensure that all employees and other persons admitted to the premises observe the Danish Health Authority's recommendations on good hygiene and appropriate conduct.
  • Display information posters telling people with symptoms of COVID-19 to isolate themselves at home.
  • Display information posters on good hygiene and appropriate conduct in public spaces.
  • Make water and soap and/or hand sanitizer (with an alcohol concentration of at least 70%) available to customers, guests and visitors to the extent possible.
  • Ensure that employees and other persons admitted to the premises use gloves when selling and delivering non-wrapped food if they touch the food with their hands.
  • Ensure that the layout of the premises is designed as far as possible to minimise the risk of infection, including that it must be possible for customers, guests and visitors to maintain social distance – also at checkouts.

The requirements apply from 18 March 2020 until at least 8 June 2020.

The Ministry of Industry, Business and Financial Affairs (Erhvervsministeriet) has collaborated with the relevant authorities, business and industry and the labour market parties to prepare guidelines for a careful layout of restaurants, cafes, amusement parks, hotels, holiday resorts etc. in light of the outbreak of COVID-19. The recommended guidelines have been uploaded to virksomhedsguiden.dk.

Yes. Workplace canteens can serve food to employees if the businesses/institutions have not closed down. This also applies in case a workplace canteen is operated by an independent contractor. 

In these situations, the Danish Health Authority's recommendations should be observed by the service provider to ensure that the layout of the premises is designed as far as possible to minimise the risk of infection, including that it must be possible for consumers in workplace canteens to maintain social distance, and that to the extent possible there is access to water and soap or hand sanitizer (with an alcohol concentration of at least 70%).
 

Yes. Hotels are allowed to stay open.

 

However, it is prohibited to organise or attend events, activities etc. with more than 10 participants at or in a hotel.

 

Please note that the police can issue a dispersal order if more than 10 people have gathered in a public place in a way that is considered by the police to constitute a particular risk of infection with the novel coronavirus.

 

If a dispersal order is deemed insufficient, the police can also issue a temporary ban on loitering at the location.

 

Restaurants and cafes etc. of hotels are allowed to stay open from 5 am to midnight. From midnight to 5 am, the establishments are allowed to sell takeaway food and drinks if they have the requisite licences under other relevant legislation.

 

All hotel facilities open to the public must also:

 

  • Ensure a free floor area of at least four square metres for each guest or visitor. However, establishments selling food, drinks or tobacco for consumption on-site may allow one guest or visitor for each two square metres of floor area unless the establishment has been designed mainly for standing guests. This applies to establishments such as bars having only a limited number of seats relative to the number of guests. One person for each two square metres of floor area can be allowed access to cultural events at premises with a seated audience. 
  • Ensure that all employees and other persons admitted to the premises observe the Danish Health Authority's recommendations on good hygiene and appropriate conduct.
  • Display information posters telling people with symptoms of COVID-19 to isolate themselves at home.
  • Display information posters on good hygiene and appropriate conduct in public spaces.
  • Make water and soap and/or hand sanitizer (with an alcohol concentration of at least 70%) available to guests and visitors to the extent possible.
  • Ensure that employees and other persons admitted to the premises use gloves when selling and delivering non-wrapped food if they touch the food with their hands.
  • Change the layout of premises to ensure social distancing between guests and visitors – also at checkouts.
Shopping arcades, shopping centres, department stores etc.

Yes. All shops are allowed to stay open, but they are required to:

 

  • Ensure a free floor area of at least four square metres for each customer or visitor. However, establishments selling food, drinks or tobacco for consumption on-site may allow one customer or visitor for each two square metres of floor area unless the establishment has been designed mainly for standing guests.
  • Ensure that all employees and other persons admitted to the premises observe the Danish Health Authority's recommendations on good hygiene and appropriate conduct.
  • Display information posters telling people with symptoms of COVID-19 to isolate themselves at home.
  • Display information posters on good hygiene and appropriate conduct in public spaces. 
  • Make water and soap and/or hand sanitizer (with an alcohol concentration of at least 70%) available to customers and visitors to the extent possible. 
  • Ensure that employees and other persons admitted to the premises use gloves when selling and delivering non-wrapped food if they touch the food with their hands. 
  • Change the layout of premises to ensure social distancing between customers and visitors – also at checkouts.

The requirements apply from 18 March 2020 until at least 8 June 2020.

 

No. According to the Executive Order, employees and other persons admitted to the premises are the only people who are required to wear gloves, and they have to do so only when selling and otherwise distributing non-wrapped food if they touch the food with their hands. 

 

As regards customers, it appears from the Executive Order that shops must make water and soap and/or hand sanitizer (with an alcohol concentration of at least 70%) available to customers and visitors to the extent possible.


Yes. As from 11 May 2020, indoor as well as outdoor shopping centres, department stores, shopping arcades etc. have been allowed to stay open. However, at these locations the current restrictions set out in the Executive Order must be observed, which entails a requirement to:

 

  • Ensure a free floor area of at least four square metres for each customer, guest or visitor. However, establishments selling food, drinks or tobacco for consumption on-site may allow one customer, guest or visitor for each two square metres of floor area unless the establishment has been designed mainly for standing guests.
  • Ensure that all employees and other persons admitted to the premises observe the Danish Health Authority's recommendations on good hygiene and appropriate conduct.
  • Display information posters telling people with symptoms of COVID-19 to isolate themselves at home.
  • Display information posters on good hygiene and appropriate conduct in public spaces. 
  • Make water and soap and/or hand sanitizer (with an alcohol concentration of at least 70%) available to customers, guests and visitors to the extent possible. 
  • Ensure that employees and other persons admitted to the premises use gloves when selling and delivering non-wrapped food if they touch the food with their hands.
  • Change the layout of premises to ensure social distancing between customers, guests and visitors – also at checkouts.

Moreover, the Ministry of Industry, Business and Financial Affairs (Erhvervsministeriet) has prepared guidelines for a careful layout of shopping centres, department stores, shopping arcades, bazaars etc., which provide recommendations on how businesses can adapt the layout of their premises in light of the outbreak of COVID-19. 

 
Sports and recreational facilities etc.
No. The Government has imposed a temporary ban preventing indoor sports and recreational activities, including gambling arcades, water parks, play areas, public swimming pools and fitness studios, from staying open. However, the ban does not apply to facilities for essential rehabilitation. The temporary ban also extends to associations like gymnastics clubs as far as indoor exercise is concerned.

The ban applies from 18 March 2020 until at least 8 June 2020.

The ban does not apply to museums, art exhibitions, STEM learning labs, public aquariums, zoos and botanical gardens, libraries, archives etc. Nor does the ban apply to premises for cultural events with a seated audience with the exception of sports events (but not the sports events mentioned below).

New rules were adopted on 8 May 2020. According to the new rules, the ban on indoor sports and recreational activities does not extend to professional sports without audience, including the top two male football leagues, the top female football league, the top male handball league, the top female handball league, the top male ice hockey league, the top badminton league, harness races and gallop races at the nine commercial horse racing tracks with licenced drivers and riders as well as other professional branches of sports in which most athletes make a living as athletes. Nor does the ban extend to athletes at senior international level whose primary source of income is their athlete's salary, or who belong to one of the athlete categories of Team Denmark or have been nominated or selected for the Olympic/Paralympic Games.
Yes. Natural and legal persons must keep certain premises closed to the public. Accordingly, the temporary ban also extends to associations, foundations etc.
No. The Government has imposed a temporary ban preventing premises for sports and recreational activities from staying open. This also applies to sports and recreational activities in riding halls. 

Horse owners are not prevented from going to the stable to tend to their horses as everybody keeping animals must observe the rules of the Animal Welfare Act requiring them to accommodate, feed, water and tend to the animals in view of the physiological, behavioural and healthcare needs of the animals.

 

The Equine Husbandry Act specifies that any person keeping a horse must ensure that the horse is checked at least once a day. 

 

As regards the exercising of horses in a riding hall, it is a requirement under the Equine Husbandry Act that horses must be exercised or be allowed to move freely in a paddock for at least two hours five days a week. Exercise means activities such as riding or lunging a horse. Therefore, it is a general requirement that horses must be exercised. As some horses (such as young horses and fiery horses) cannot be exercised in the open air, it is allowed to exercise horses in a riding hall; however, the ban on gatherings of more than 10 people must still be observed. Horse riding lessons and group training in riding halls are not allowed as riding halls cannot be used for activities in the nature of sports and recreational activities.

 
Yes. Owners and employees of riding schools and stud farms are allowed to exercise the horses of the riding school or stud farm in the riding hall as it is a requirement under the Equine Husbandry Act that horses must be exercised or be allowed to move freely in a paddock for at least two hours five days a week. Exercise means activities such as riding or lunging a horse. Therefore, it is a general requirement that horses must be exercised. As some horses (such as young horses and fiery horses) cannot be exercised in the open air, it is allowed to exercise horses in a riding hall; however, the ban on gatherings of more than 10 people must still be observed. Horse riding lessons and group training in riding halls are not allowed as riding halls cannot be used for activities in the nature of sports and recreational activities.
Yes. Outdoor riding lessons do not fall within the requirement to close sports and recreational facilities.
 However, the ban on gatherings of more than 10 people must still be observed. 
 
No. In that case, stables are considered premises for sports and recreational activities. The riding school staff must therefore bring the horses out of and into the stables in connection with outdoor riding school lessons. 
Yes. Clubs in the 3F Super League and the NordicBet League are allowed to play football again. All football matches must be played without any audience.
Yes. The ban on gatherings and the requirement to keep sports and recreational facilities closed to the public does not apply to professional sports without audience, including leauges with professional athletes and individual athletes at senior international level whose primary source of income is their athlete's salary, or who belong to one of the athlete categories of Team Denmark or have been nominated or selected for the Olympic/Paralympic Games.
Yes. It is allowed to use fitness equipment installed in or relocated to open-air spaces or outdoors in a way that the equipment is no longer deemed to be located in a building.

If the fitness facility is open to the public and there are more than 10 people present at the fitness facility even though it is not considered an activity or event as such, the police can order the people to leave the place if the police find that there is a particular risk of infection with the novel coronavirus. The police have discretionary powers to issue directions pursuant to the health authorities' general recommendations to reduce social contact and maintain social distancing.

If a dispersal order is deemed insufficient, the police can also issue a temporary ban on loitering at the location.

If group fitness activities are organised in a public place, the activities usually fall within the scope of the ban on activities and events with more than 10 participants.

New rules were adopted on 8 May 2020. According to the new rules, the Executive Order does not extend to professional sports without audience, including the top two male football leagues, the top female football league, the top male handball league, the top female handball league, the top male ice hockey league, the top badminton league, harness races and gallop races at the nine commercial horse racing tracks with licenced drivers and riders as well as other professional branches of sports in which most athletes make a living as athletes. Nor does the ban extend to athletes at senior international level whose primary source of income is their athlete's salary, or who belong to one of the athlete categories of Team Denmark or have been nominated or selected for the Olympic/Paralympic Games.
Yes, if activities are performed in groups of no more than 10 people (including coaches, parents etc.). If there are more groups of no more than 10 people at the same sports facility at the same time, it must be ensured that the distance between the groups is sufficient to prevent them from constituting one big group. One way of achieving this is to divide the area into sections with a clear distance between the individual sections and allocate a separate section to each group.

If training sessions can be organised for groups of no more than 10 people and the groups are effectively separated, have their own coaches and otherwise observe the ban on gatherings of more than 10 people, it is possible to have several concurrent training sessions.

What is essential is that the individual groups are effectively separated so that it can be determined in the specific circumstances that they are individual groups of no more than 10 people.
Yes, if activities are performed in groups of no more than 10 people (including leaders, parents etc.). If there are more groups of no more than 10 people within the same area at the same time, it must be ensured that the distance between the groups is sufficient to prevent them from constituting one big group. One way of achieving this is to divide the area into sections with a clear distance between the individual sections and allocate a separate section to each group.

If the activity can be organised for groups of no more than 10 people and the groups are effectively separated, have their own leaders and otherwise observe the ban on gatherings of more than 10 people, it is possible to have several concurrent activities.

What is essential is that the individual groups are effectively separated so that it can be determined in the specific circumstances that they are individual groups of no more than 10 people.
 
Yes. If a fitness studio or other such venue is still closed to the public, it is the assessment of the National Police that nothing prevents the fitness studio or other venue from uploading, to social media platforms, workout videos or guides in which a fitness instructor demonstrates a training programme that members can use at home.

Yes. In the assessment of the National Police, treetop adventure parks are allowed to stay open. 

Please note that the police can issue a dispersal order if more than 10 people have gathered in a public place in a way that is considered by the police to constitute a particular risk of infection with the novel coronavirus. 

If a dispersal order is deemed insufficient, the police can also issue a temporary ban on loitering at the location.

All visitor facilities open to the public in tree-top adventure parks must also:

  • Ensure a free floor area of at least four square metres for each guest or visitor. However, establishments selling food, drinks or tobacco for consumption on-site may allow one guest or visitor for each two square metres of floor area unless the establishment has been designed mainly for standing guests.
  • Ensure that all employees and other persons admitted to the premises observe the Danish Health Authority's recommendations on good hygiene and appropriate conduct.
  • Display information posters telling people with symptoms of COVID-19 to isolate themselves at home.
  • Display information posters on good hygiene and appropriate conduct in public spaces. 
  • Make water and soap and/or hand sanitizer (with an alcohol concentration of at least 70%) available to guests and visitors to the extent possible.
  • Ensure that employees and other persons admitted to the premises use gloves when selling and delivering non-wrapped food if they touch the food with their hands.
  • Change the layout of premises to ensure social distancing between guests and visitors – also at checkouts.

In general, tree-top adventure parks are urged to observe the health authorities' general recommendations on good hygiene, social distancing and appropriate conduct.

 

Basically no. A game of golf would usually not be banned.

 

If an event or activity is organised at a golf club, on the green etc. for more than 10 participants, an assessment must be made of the specific circumstances in each individual case to determine whether it is to be defined as an outdoor event or activity that is banned.

Where more than 10 people have gathered in a public place, including at a golf course, even though it is not an event, activity or the like, the police can issue a dispersal order if the police find that the people present constitute a particular risk of infection with the novel coronavirus. 

However, the police strongly urge people to observe the health authorities' general recommendations on good hygiene, social distancing and appropriate conduct.

 

Facilities of sports and recreational clubs, such as clubhouses, including toilet facilities, are allowed to stay open on the condition that the facilities are not used for sports or recreational activities. In the assessment of the National Police, showering and changing of clothes are considered to be an integral part of sports and recreational activities, for which reason changing rooms and showers must remain closed.  

 

It is not allowed to organise or attend events, activities etc. with more than 10 participants at or in a clubhouse etc.

Where more than 10 people have gathered in a public place, including at facilities connected to a sports or recreational activity, even though it is not an event, activity or the like, the police can issue a dispersal order if the police find that the people present constitute a particular risk of infection with the novel coronavirus. 

Please note that several sports organisations urge sports clubs to keep their clubhouses closed. 

The police strongly urge people to observe the health authorities' general recommendations on good hygiene, social distancing and appropriate conduct.

New rules were adopted on 8 May 2020. According to the new rules, the Executive Order does not extend to professional sports without audience, including the top two male football leagues, the top female football league, the top male handball league, the top female handball league, the top male ice hockey league, the top badminton league, harness races and gallop races at the nine commercial horse racing tracks with licenced drivers and riders as well as other professional branches of sports in which most athletes make a living as athletes. Nor does the ban extend to athletes at senior international level whose primary source of income is their athlete's salary, or who belong to one of the athlete categories of Team Denmark or have been nominated or selected for the Olympic/Paralympic Games.

As the authority responsible for the field of sports, the Ministry of Culture (Kulturministeriet) has issued guidelines with recommendations for reallowing outdoor activities of sports clubs and associations. The recommended guidelines have been uploaded to www.kum.dk

 

Basically, the premises of public cultural and recreational institutions must stay closed to the public.

The ban does not apply to public cultural and recreational institutions hosting cultural events with a seated audience of no more than 500 participants, museums, art exhibitions, STEM learning labs, public aquariums, zoos and botanical gardens, libraries, archives etc. However, sports events are not excepted from the ban.

Restaurants and cafes at public cultural and recreational institutions are allowed to stay open from 5 am to midnight. Moreover, the establishments are allowed to stay open to sell food and drinks not consumed on-site (takeaway) from midnight to 5 am if they have the requisite licences under other relevant legislation.

Premises of public cultural and recreational institutions open to the public must:

 

  • Ensure a free floor area of at least four square metres for each user or visitor. However, establishments selling food, drinks or tobacco for consumption on-site may allow one user or visitor for each two square metres of floor area unless the establishment has been designed mainly for standing guests. One person for each two square metres of floor area can be allowed access to cultural events at premises with a seated audience.
  • Ensure that all employees and other persons admitted to the premises observe the Danish Health Authority's recommendations on good hygiene and appropriate conduct.
  • Display information posters telling people with symptoms of COVID-19 to isolate themselves at home.
  • Display information posters on good hygiene and appropriate conduct in public spaces.
  • Make water and soap and/or hand sanitizer (with an alcohol concentration of at least 70%) available to users and visitors to the extent possible. 
  • Change the layout of premises to ensure social distancing between users and visitors – also at checkouts.

Yes. The letting of camping sites and cabins is not banned by legislation, but certain pertaining activities like indoor play areas, water parks, gambling arcades etc. must stay closed.

Restaurants and cafes at camping areas and holiday resorts are allowed to stay open from 5 am to midnight. Moreover, the establishments are allowed to stay open to sell food and drinks not consumed on-site (takeaway) from midnight to 5 am if they have the requisite licences under other relevant legislation. Other premises at camping areas and holiday resorts such as kiosks, shared kitchen facilities as well as shower and toilet facilities can also stay open.

Premises open to the public must:

 

  • Ensure a free floor area of at least four square metres for each guest or visitor. However, establishments selling food, drinks or tobacco for consumption on-site may allow one guest or visitor for each two square metres of floor area unless the establishment has been designed mainly for standing guests.
  • Ensure that all employees and other persons admitted to the premises observe the Danish Health Authority's recommendations on good hygiene and appropriate conduct.
  • Display information posters telling people with symptoms of COVID-19 to isolate themselves at home.
  • Display information posters on good hygiene and appropriate conduct in public spaces.
  • Make water and soap and/or hand sanitizer (with an alcohol concentration of at least 70%) available to guests and visitors to the extent possible. 
  • Ensure that employees and other persons admitted to the premises use gloves when selling and delivering non-wrapped food if they touch the food with their hands.
  • Change the layout of premises to ensure social distancing between guests and visitors – also at checkouts.

Moreover, citizens are urged to observe the health authorities' general recommendations on good hygiene, social distancing and appropriate conduct to the extent possible.

No. An Internet cafe is similar to a location for recreational activities. Internet cafes must therefore stay closed.

The ban applies from 18 March 2020 until at least 8 June 2020.
 

Yes. Zoos, animal parks, public aquariums etc. can stay open.

Premises at zoos open to the public must:

 

  • Ensure a free floor area of at least four square metres for each guest or visitor. However, establishments selling food, drinks or tobacco for consumption on-site may allow one guest or visitor for each two square metres of floor area unless the establishment has been designed mainly for standing guests. One person for each two square metres of floor area can be allowed access to cultural events at premises with a seated audience.
  • Ensure that all employees and other persons admitted to the premises observe the Danish Health Authority's recommendations on good hygiene and appropriate conduct.
  • Display information posters telling people with symptoms of COVID-19 to isolate themselves at home.
  • Display information posters on good hygiene and appropriate conduct in public spaces.
  • Make water and soap and/or hand sanitizer (with an alcohol concentration of at least 70%) available to guests and visitors to the extent possible. 
  • Ensure that employees and other persons admitted to the premises use gloves when selling and delivering non-wrapped food if they touch the food with their hands.
  • Change the layout of premises to ensure social distancing between guests and visitors – also at checkouts.

Moreover, citizens are urged to observe the health authorities' general recommendations on good hygiene, social distancing and appropriate conduct to the extent possible.

Yes. Circus shows with a seated audience of no more than 500 participants are allowed.

 

Premises open to the public must:

 

  • Ensure a free floor area of at least four square metres for each guest or visitor. However, establishments selling food, drinks or tobacco for consumption on-site may allow one guest or visitor for each two square metres of floor area unless the establishment has been designed mainly for standing guests. One person for each two square metres of floor area can be allowed access to cultural events at premises with a seated audience.
  • Ensure that all employees and other persons admitted to the premises observe the Danish Health Authority's recommendations on good hygiene and appropriate conduct.
  • Display information posters telling people with symptoms of COVID-19 to isolate themselves at home.
  • Display information posters on good hygiene and appropriate conduct in public spaces.
  • Make water and soap and/or hand sanitizer (with an alcohol concentration of at least 70%) available to guests and visitors to the extent possible. 
  • Ensure that employees and other persons admitted to the premises use gloves when selling and delivering non-wrapped food if they touch the food with their hands.
  • Change the layout of premises to ensure social distancing between guests and visitors – also at checkouts.

Moreover, citizens are urged to observe the health authorities' general recommendations on good hygiene, social distancing and appropriate conduct to the extent possible.

Permanent and mobile amusements parks etc. must keep rides, performances etc. closed to the public. Rides must be interpreted widely and include roller coasters, merry-go-rounds etc. as well as shooting and throwing games etc. 

However, restaurants, ice cream vendors, souvenir shops etc. at permanent and mobile amusement parks can stay open, and the amusement park itself can also be used as if it was an ordinary park.
 

Basically no. Recreational angling at a put-and-take fishery is not an event, activity or the like that falls within the scope of the ban on gatherings of more than 10 people.

 

Ordinary visits to a put-and-take fishery are therefore allowed, normally even if there are more than 10 people. 

However, if an event or activity such as an angling event for more than 10 people is organised at a put-and-take fishery, the event will fall within the scope of the ban.

 

It always depends on an assessment of the specific circumstances whether it is an event, activity or the like.

Where more than 10 people have gathered in a public place, including at a put-and-take fishery, even though it is not an event, activity or the like, the police can issue a dispersal order if the police find that the people present constitute a particular risk of infection with the novel coronavirus. 

If a dispersal order is deemed insufficient, the police can also issue a temporary ban on loitering at the location.

However, the police strongly urge people to observe the health authorities' general recommendations on good hygiene, social distancing and appropriate conduct. 

 
Drive-in events fall within the scope of the Executive Order on Public Entertainment. Prior permission to hold an event must therefore be obtained from the police. The police may issue conditions for a permission, including conditions intended to reduce the risk of spreading the disease and conditions intended to maintain peace and order. A safety plan must be prepared for certain events.

Restaurants and cafes are allowed to stay open from 5 am to midnight to sell food and drinks. Moreover, the establishments are allowed to stay open to sell food and drinks not consumed on-site (takeaway) from midnight to 5 am if they have the requisite licences under other relevant legislation.

Where more than 10 people have gathered in a public place even though it is not an event, activity or the like, the police can issue a dispersal order if the police find that the people present constitute a particular risk of infection with the novel coronavirus.

Stage performances etc. that are not otherwise allowed cannot be made lawful by being converted into a drive-in event.
Yes. Outdoor dog training lessons do not fall within the requirement to close sports and recreational facilities.
 Therefore, outdoor dog training lessons and other group activities can be organised when no more than 10 people gather for the activity.

Indoor dog training lessons are not allowed because premises for sports and recreational activities must remain closed to the public. 
 
Yes. Guests at pubs etc. can use pool tables, jukeboxes, dart games, slot machines etc.

However, gambling arcades fall within the temporary ban on staying open. The same applies if a gambling arcade is located in a separate room adjacent to a pub, a kiosk or the like.

In the opinion of the National Police, bars whose main objective is to offer sports or recreational activities, such as bowling halls and pool halls, also fall within the temporary ban on staying open.

The Ministry of Industry, Business and Financial Affairs (Erhvervsministeriet) has collaborated with the relevant authorities, business and industry and the labour market parties to prepare guidelines for a careful layout of restaurants, cafes, amusement parks, hotels, holiday resorts etc. in light of the outbreak of COVID-19, including on the cleaning of common contact points. The recommended guidelines have been uploaded to virksomhedsguiden.dk.

Yes, museums are allowed to stay open.

Restaurants and cafes at museums are also allowed to stay open to sell food and drinks.

Premises of museums open to the public must:

 

  • Ensure a free floor area of at least four square metres for each guest or visitor. However, establishments selling food, drinks or tobacco for consumption on-site may allow one guest or visitor for each two square metres of floor area unless the establishment has been designed mainly for standing guests. One person for each two square metres of floor area can be allowed access to cultural events at premises with a seated audience.
  • Ensure that all employees and other persons admitted to the premises observe the Danish Health Authority's recommendations on good hygiene and appropriate conduct.
  • Display information posters telling people with symptoms of COVID-19 to isolate themselves at home.
  • Display information posters on good hygiene and appropriate conduct in public spaces.
  • Make water and soap and/or hand sanitizer (with an alcohol concentration of at least 70%) available to guests and visitors to the extent possible. 
  • Change the layout of premises to ensure social distancing between guests and visitors – also at checkouts.

The police can issue a dispersal order if more than 10 people have gathered in the outdoor areas of a museum in a way that is considered by the police to constitute a particular risk of infection with the novel coronavirus.

If a dispersal order is deemed insufficient, the police can also issue a temporary ban on loitering at the location.

Moreover, citizens are urged to observe the health authorities' general recommendations on good hygiene, social distancing and appropriate conduct to the extent possible.

Religious ceremonies etc.

Yes. The ban on gatherings of more than 10 people does not apply at premises usually at the disposal of the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Denmark and other religious communities, and the police cannot issue a dispersal order if the police find that the people present constitute a particular risk of infection with novel coronavirus. 

Nor does the maximum number of participants of 10 apply to burial and funeral services, including graveside services at cemeteries in connection with funerals. 

However, the requirements of minimum free floor area, layout, information posters and the possibility of maintaining good hygiene that are applicable to premises open to the public must be met for premises of the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Denmark and other religious communities to be open to people.

 

The Evangelical Lutheran Church of Denmark and other religious communities otherwise fall within the scope of the current ban on gatherings of more than 10 people if religious ceremonies are performed outside of premises that are usually at the disposal of the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Denmark or another religious community, in which cases the police have the right to issue a dispersal order. This also applies to events like walking funeral processions, as a walking funeral procession will not be considered part of a funeral service and is therefore subject to the maximum number of 10 participants. 

Moreover, citizens are urged to observe the health authorities' general recommendations on good hygiene, social distancing and appropriate conduct. 

 
No. Ordinary religious services and prayers, such as Friday prayers, are not opinion-shaping gatherings. 
Yes. The religious ceremony can be performed if the ceremony is held at the premises of the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Denmark or another religious community. In that case, the requirements of minimum free floor area, layout, information posters and the possibility of maintaining good hygiene must be met.

If the ceremony is performed outdoors, the ceremony can be attended by no more than 10 people, inclusive of the representatives of the church.

It should be noted that the general ban on gatherings of more than 10 people does not apply to parties and other celebrations in connection with a religious ceremony held in a private home or an adjacent garden, whereas it still applies to courtyards and the like which are at the disposal of residents from a large number of homes. Citizens are urged to cancel private gatherings or events for more than 10 participants and to observe the health authorities' general recommendations on good hygiene, social distancing and appropriate conduct. It is also essential to be aware of any guests at high risk of infection.

Parties with more than 10 participants are not allowed at village halls or restaurants.
Service providers having close in-person contact with clients and customers, such as hairdressers

Yes. Tattooists, body piercers, spa clinics, body lounges, beauty parlours, massage parlours, hairdressers and other premises at which clients are offered services involving close physical contact between the service provider and the client as well as on tanning studios are allowed to stay open as the temporary ban was lifted on 20 April 2020. 

 

They are, however, required to:

  • Ensure a free floor area of at least four square metres for each client, customer or visitor. 
  • Ensure that all employees and other persons admitted to the premises observe the Danish Health Authority's recommendations on good hygiene and appropriate conduct.
  • Display information posters telling people with symptoms of COVID-19 to isolate themselves at home.
  • Display information posters on good hygiene and appropriate conduct in public spaces. 
  • Make water and soap and/or hand sanitizer (with an alcohol concentration of at least 70%) available to clients, customers and visitors to the extent possible. 
  • Ensure that employees and other persons admitted to the premises use gloves when selling and delivering non-wrapped food if they touch the food with their hands.
  • Change the layout of premises to ensure social distancing between clients, customers and visitors – also at checkouts.

Yes. The rules of the Executive Order do not apply to public and private hospitals and clinics nor to private clinics and shops run by authorised healthcare professionals or at which authorised healthcare professionals are employed. 

Authorised healthcare professionals are persons listed in the Authorisation Register within one of the following categories:

  • Nurse
  • Social and healthcare assistant
  • Medical doctor
  • Dentist
  • Paramedic
  • Prosthetist and orthotist
  • Prescribing pharmacist
  • Medical laboratory technologist
  • Occupational therapist
  • Chiropodist
  • Physiotherapist
  • Midwife
  • Chiropractor
  • Clinical dietician
  • Clinical dental technician
  • Osteopath (including any non-authorised osteopath practising under the transition scheme)
  • Optician and optometrist
  • Radiographer
  • Dental hygienist
 
Theory training classes are considered events within the meaning of the Executive Order. Theory training classes are therefore allowed only for groups of no more than 10 people.

If classes are held in premises open to the public, the requirements of minimum free floor area, layout, information posters and the possibility of maintaining good hygiene must be met.

Driving lessons have been allowed again since 20 April 2020.

However, driving schools are urged to observe the health authorities' general recommendations on good hygiene, social distancing and appropriate conduct.

The police started conducting driving tests and driving theory tests again on 29 April 2020.  
 
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