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If you are travelling to or from Denmark

Frequently asked questions and answers from The Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Denmark, Danish National Police etc. regarding travelling in or out of Denmark.

If you are stranded abroad

The Ministry of Foreign Affairs strongly advises all Danes and Danish residents to explore all possibilities for return travel to Denmark, including contacting your travel agency, airline and insurance company. Return travel may also be available via connecting flights in other countries. The authorities are in dialogue with the travel industry to ensure that Danes and Danish residents on holiday abroad have the opportunity to travel back to Denmark. 

 

The Ministry of Foreign Affairs strongly advises anyone returning from private travel – or who has returned within the past two weeks – to stay home for 14 days after returning from travel abroad. This advice applies to both Danes and foreigners entering Denmark. 

 

Those returning from travel should – as everyone is encouraged to at the moment – avoid physical contact and keep distance. It is not necessary for the others in the household to take special precautions, but everyone should follow the National Health Authorities general advice on limiting the spread of infection in the community. 

 

You can read more on the National Health Authorities’ advice and search for information at www.coronasmitte.dk. 

 

Remember to sign up on Danskerlisten – the list of Danes abroad – using the “Rejseklar” app or via www.um.dk. Danes who are registered on Danskerlisten will automatically receive updates and information from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Denmark via e-mail and/or text message. 

 

If necessary, you can also contact the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Denmark’s Global Help Desk 24 hours a day by writing to bbb@um.dk or calling (+45) 33 92 11 12. 

 

If you are travelling and have difficulty travelling back to Denmark, or if you choose to continue your journey, it is strongly advised to follow the recommendations of the local authorities and stay informed via local media and Danish embassies, who will update their websites with the latest information. 

 

Explore all possibilities for return travel to Denmark, including contacting your travel agency, airline and insurance company. Return travel may also be available via connecting flights in other countries. This recommendation applies for all Danes and persons residing in Denmark. 

 

If there are no available options for return travel, find appropriate accommodations where you can meet your daily needs. Follow the instructions of the local authorities. 

 

Sign up on Danskerlisten and write to the local Danish Embassy or Consulate. You can also contact the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Denmark’s Global Help Desk 24 hours a day by writing to bbb@um.dk or calling (+45) 33 92 11 12. 

 

If you are stranded and cannot currently leave the country via commercial services, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Denmark and its embassies abroad will work in collaboration with the embassies of other countries and the local authorities to find solutions so that stranded travellers can return home. 

 

You (or, if applicable, your insurance company) will also have to pay for your return travel in such a situation. The Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Denmark has no authority to cover the costs of citizens’ travel home to Denmark. 

 

The Danish Ministry of Foreign Affairs monitors the global situation closely and will be prepared to evacuate Danes with no other means of returning to Denmark, if necessary.

 

If you are stranded and unable to travel out of the country, you should first and foremost find accommodations and ensure that you have water that is safe to drink, food, necessary medicine, a cell phone/Wi-Fi, contacts or money raising opportunities, as well as the possibilities of access to health care should you become ill. Follow the recommendations of the health authorities, which you can read more about at www.coronasmitte.dk.

 

The Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Denmark is working to find solutions in collaboration with the respective national authorities, airlines, travel industry and other European countries, so that Danes can return home via commercial flights. We advise patience, as this situation may take some time to resolve. 

 

Dedicated task forces has been established at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Denmark’s Global Help Desk.

 

If you are stranded in Asia please contact the Global Help Desk by phone on (+45) 3392 1344 or by e-mail to coronaasien@um.dk

 

If you are stranded in Central or South America please contact the Global Help Desk by phone on (+45) 3392 1345 or by e-mail to coronasydamerika@um.dk.

 

If you are stranded in Africa please contact the Global Help Desk by phone on (+45) 33 92 09 96 or by e-mail to coronaafrika@um.dk

 

This applies to Danish nationals and citizens with a place of residence in Denmark. 

 

Also remember to sign up on Danskerlisten – the list of Danes abroad – using the “Rejseklar” app or via www.um.dk. Danes who are registered on Danskerlisten will automatically receive updates and information from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Denmark via e-mail and/or text message.

 

Stay in contact with your travel agent, airline and travel insurance provider, and follow the instructions of the local authorities.

 

If you require special help or assistance, contact the relevant task force, the Global Help Desk at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Denmark, or the Danish Embassy in the specific country you are in.

 

If the local authority where you are proposes to quarantine you for your own protection, you should follow their advice. If there are suspected cases of coronavirus where you are, you may need to remain in your hotel room or accommodation for 14 days, move to quarantine facilities, take tests for coronavirus and, if positive in some cases, be hospitalized abroad.

 

In this case, you should contact your travel agency, airline or insurance company as soon as you can.

 
Tourists already in Denmark

In the recent days and weeks, the Danish Government and the Danish authorities have taken a series of difficult precautionary measures in the effort to contain the spread of COVID-19/coronavirus. There is a risk that extensive entry of persons from abroad who have not been subject to similar precautionary measures will undermine the effectiveness of the measures taken in Denmark.

 

The Danish Ministry of Foreign Affairs now advises Danes against all non-essential travel worldwide, at least until 10 May 2020. 

 

The Danish government has imposed control of all Danish borders effective Saturday 14 March 2020 at 12:00 noon lasting preliminarily until 10 May 2020 at 23h59. Persons wishing to enter Denmark must expect to be rejected entry at the Danish borders, including in Danish airports, unless they have a worthy purpose for entering, e.g. if the person lives or works in Denmark or has been commissioned to provide goods or services in Denmark. As a result of the border control measures, those seeking to enter Denmark should expect significantly prolonged travel times. 

 

There are no outbound travel restrictions specifically for tourists leaving Denmark. As a result of the border control measures, those seeking to leave Denmark should also expect significantly prolonged travel times.

 

The Danish Health Authority recommendation has also introduced several new precautionary health measures. You can find further information on the measures on their website.

 

If you have further doubts or questions, we advise you to reach out to your country’s embassy or consulate in Denmark. 

 
Information on coronavirus/COVID-19 can be found here on the English-language section of the Danish authorities’ joint website on coronavirus/COVID-19.
Travels to Denmark

Travellers can enter Denmark if they:

  • Are Danish citizens
  • Have residence in Denmark, Greenland or Faroe Islands 
  • Need to transit through Denmark to return to your country of residence (e.g. Swedes to transferring through Denmark to return to Sweden) or have a worthy purpose to transit through Denmark 
  • Have a worthy purpose for entry (see the question “What are worthy purposes?”)

Note that if you are arriving to Denmark from your private trip from any country, regardless of the status of the country of departure, the duration of your stay, and whether you are a citizen or a resident, you are strongly advised to stay at home for 14 days, comply with the general guidelines for appropriate behaviour in public spaces during transportation, avoid close contact with other people, and pay extra attention to symptoms of COVID-19.

Employees performing critical functions in the health-, elderly-and general care sectors or employees who work with vulnerable people, should contact their employer in order to agree on the terms of their return to work. This includes an assessment of whether the employee can be tested for infection with COVID-19. On that basis, a concrete and individual assessment of whether the person can start work immediately after returning home is made.

 

 

 

The Ministry of Foreign affairs strongly advise anyone returning from private travel – or who has returned within the past two weeks – to stay at home for 14 days after returning from travel abroad. The advice applies to both Danes and foreigners who enter Denmark.

 

If you experience symptoms of COVID-19, you are advised to follow the recommendations of the Danish Health Authority

 

Employees performing critical functions in the health-, elderly-and general care sectors or employees who work with vulnerable people, should contact their employer in order to agree on the terms of their return to work. This includes an assessment of whether the employee can be tested for infection with COVID-19. On that basis, a concrete and individual assessment of whether the person can start work immediately after returning home is made.

If you commute to/from work in Denmark from e.g. Sweden or Germany (or vice versa), you will not have to stay at home for 14 days between commutes.

The airline cannot, with reference to the temporary Danish travel restrictions, refuse you from boarding your flight to Denmark if you are a Danish citizen or resident (See the question “Can I enter Denmark?”). 

 

In some cases, you may be asked to document that you have the right to enter Denmark.

 

If you are not a Danish citizen or resident, you must be able to document that you have a worthy purpose for entering Denmark. If you cannot document a purpose deemed worthy, you will be denied entry at the Danish border.

 

German authorities have set up an FAQ and a hotline, where travellers can ask about the possibilities of entering or passing through Germany. 

 

The FAQ can be found on the website of the Federal Ministry of the Interior, Building and Community of Germany.

 

The German hotline can be reached on: +49 800 688 8000

 

Danish citizens are always permitted entry into Denmark. Other persons wishing to enter Denmark must expect to be rejected at the Danish borders, unless they have a worthy purpose (anerkendelsesværdigt formål) for entering.

 

Worthy purposes include, but are not limited to:

  • Persons residing or working in Denmark, including self-employed entrepreneurs performing work in Denmark.
  • Persons with a valid work permit, including persons who have not yet utilised their work permit and whose entry is for the purpose of working in Denmark.
  • Persons commissioned to deliver goods or services to/in Denmark or to transport goods out of Denmark. This provision includes persons who, for business purposes, are using a passenger car to transport goods out of Denmark.
  • Persons who enter for the purpose of exercising visitation rights with minors.
  • Persons who serve as the primary caregiver for minors residing in Denmark (e.g. foster parents).
  • Persons who are entering to visit seriously ill or dying family members in Denmark.
  • Persons entering Denmark to participate in an ongoing course of treatment administered by the Danish health authorities.
  • Persons who are attending a funeral in Denmark.
  • Persons who are participating in a court proceedings in Denmark.
  • Students, to the extent that educational institutions are not closed (and no remote learning options are offered).
  • Seamen who must disembark or embark in Denmark in connection with a crew change.
  • Aircraft crew members, diplomats, offshore workers or other groups of persons mentioned in the the Schengen Borders Code Annex VII. However, shore leave for seamen (see Schengen Borders Code, Annex VII, point 3) is not considered a worthy purpose. 

The list is based on information from the Danish Police.

 

If the above examples and the website of the Danish Police do not provide an answer to whether the purpose of a specific travel is considered worthy you may call the police’s dedicated hotline. The hotline can be reached on +45 7020 6044.

 
The EU’s recommended entry restrictions do not apply to entry into the EU, if this is part of return from other travels for union citizens or nationals of Schengen-associated countries (Iceland, Lichtenstein, Norway and Switzerland), their close family members or citizens residing in the EU in accordance with relevant EU-law. Furthermore, the entry restrictions do not apply to persons in transit as part of their return upon travel. If you are travelling in another country (including EU- and Schengen countries) on your way to Denmark, we still recommend that you stay up to date on possible entry restrictions, e.g. via government websites in the country.

Non-Danish citizens with a permanent residence in Denmark need to be able to document their residency for instance with a social security card, a residency card, a lease, other forms of identification with an address or through another credible manner. 

 

If necessary, the Danish Embassy can issue documentation of Danish residency, if you are registered in the Danish Civil Registration System (CPR) and if you have no other form of documentation.

 
In the recent days and weeks, the Danish Government and the Danish authorities have taken a series of difficult precautionary measures in the effort to contain the spread of COVID-19/coronavirus. There is a risk that extensive entry of persons from abroad who have not been subject to similar precautionary measures will undermine the effectiveness of the measures taken in Denmark.

The Government has notified the EU Commission and the other EU Member States, including Sweden and Germany, that effective Saturday 14 March 2020 at 12:00 noon, the existing temporary border control will be expanded to include control of all of Denmark’s borders as part of the effort to curb the spread of COVID-19/coronavirus.

This measure is supported by a visible control apparatus at all significant Danish border crossings, including in airports. Furthermore, this will also include a complete stop of all cruise ship traffic to Denmark. These border control measures will remain in effect at least until 10 May 2020.

Persons wishing to enter Denmark must expect to be rejected entry at the Danish borders, including in Danish airports, unless they are Danish citizens, residents, or have a worthy purpose for entering, e.g. if the person lives or works in Denmark or has been commissioned to provide goods or services in Denmark (see the questions “what are worthy purposes?” and “I’m travelling to Denmark, can I enter the country?”).

As a result of the border control measures, those seeking to enter Denmark should expect significantly prolonged travel times.

The Ministry of Foreign affairs strongly advise anyone returning from private travel – or who has returned within the past two weeks – to stay at home for 14 days after returning from travel abroad. The advice applies to both Danes and foreigners who enter Denmark

Those returning should also comply with the general guidelines for appropriate behaviour in public spaces during transportation, avoid close contact with other people, and pay extra attention to symptoms of COVID-19.

The Faroe Islands are a part of the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Denmark does therefore not provide a travel guide for the Faroe Islands. For the same reason, the entry restrictions of Denmark also applies to the Faroe Islands.

The Faroe Islands have minimized all air traffic to and from the Faroe Islands, which means that all aircraft not departing from Denmark are closed. You should be aware, that the flight connections to Denmark are limited.

 

The Faroese government has announced that they are closing a number of social functions. All travellers are advised to go on a 14-day self-imposed quarantine.

 

For further information, please refer to the Faroese government’s website.

 

Furthermore, reference is made to the Faroese health authorities for information and knowledge about coronavirus in relation to the Faroe Islands.

 

The situation regarding coronavirus is rapidly evolving. You should always, also in relation to travel activities, read the Danish Health Authorities recommendations on coronavirus/COVID 19

 

Greenland is a part of the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Denmark does therefore not provide a travel guide for Greenland. For the same reason, the entry restrictions of Denmark also applies to Greenland.

The Greenlandic authorities can be reached via corona@nanoq.gl and via the Greenlandic corona-hotline (00299) 80 11 00.

Naalakkersuisut – the Government of Greenland – has sent out the following instructions:

 

Travels in Greenland through 30 April 2020:

 

  1. All travels within Greenland, as well as to and from Greenland, continue to be closed until April 30, with the exception of journeys approved by the Police and the medical authority through the visitation group.
  2. Travel between districts is strongly advised against.
  3. Non-essential travel within districts is strongly advised against. Essential travel include: travels for the purpose of maintaining business and other social functions.

Naalakkersuisut has issued a general ban on travels from Nuuk to other cities and townships, including to Kapisillit and Qeqertarsuatsiaat. Travellers in Nuuk must stay in Nuuk until the travel ban is lifted. This ban does not affect fisheries and other business and leisure activities outside the city limits, as long as there is no contact with surrounding towns, townships and other inhabited areas - or residents of these places.


For additional information please refer to the Greenlandic health authorities which is the official channel in Greenland for information and knowledge regarding the coronavirus.

 

The situation regarding coronavirus is rapidly evolving. You should always, also in relation to travel activities, read the Danish Health Authorities recommendations on coronavirus/COVID 19.

Travels through Denmark

Explore all possibilities for return travel to Denmark, including contacting your travel agency, airline and insurance company. Return travel may also be available via connecting flights in other countries. This recommendation applies for all Danes and persons residing in Denmark.

 

If there are no available options for return travel, find appropriate accommodations where you can meet your daily needs. Follow the instructions of the local authorities.

 

Sign up on Danskerlisten and write to the local Danish Embassy or Consulate.

 

You can also contact the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Denmark’s Global Help Desk 24 hours a day by writing to bbb@um.dk or calling (+45) 33 92 11 12.

 

If you are stranded and cannot currently leave the country via commercial services, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Denmark and its embassies abroad will work in collaboration with the embassies of other countries and the local authorities to find solutions so that stranded travellers can return home.

 

The Ministry of Foreign Affairs is working around the clock with travel organizers and airlines to organize transport back to Denmark. But we must also prepare for the fact that it will not be possible to make sure everyone comes home in the very short term.

 

You (or, if applicable, your insurance company) will also have to pay for your return travel in such a situation. The Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Denmark has no authority to cover the costs of citizens’ travel home to Denmark.

 

Currently, there is not an identified need to evacuate Danes abroad. The Danish Ministry of Foreign Affairs monitors the global situation closely and will be prepared to evacuate Danes with no other means of returning to Denmark, if necessary.

 

The Danish Government has implemented border control at all of Denmark’s borders as part of the effort to curb the spread of COVID-19/coronavirus, as of now until 10 May.

 

Persons wishing to enter Denmark must expect to be rejected at the Danish borders, including in Danish airports, unless they have a worthy purpose for entering, e.g. if the person is Danish, lives or works in Denmark, or has been commissioned to provide goods or services in Denmark. This change does not mean that the Danish borders are being closed for entry by Danes or others who reside in Denmark that are returning home from holiday or other stays abroad (see the question “Can I enter Denmark?”). 

 

Persons crossing the Danish border to return to their countries of residence, e.g. Swedes who have been on holiday abroad, will be deemed to have a worthy purpose for entry. The same applies for travellers in transit in airports and for airline personnel.

 

The Danish authorities are continuously assessing the potential need for further measures regarding entry into Denmark. For updates on current measures, see coronasmitte.dk. You can also find more information about entry restrictions at this website.

Transit through Denmark is only permitted if the travel has a worthy purpose, e.g. Swedes who have been on holiday abroad and wish to enter Denmark for the purpose of returning home or tourists in Sweden wishing to fly to their home country through Kastrup Airport. The transit must be completed without undue delay.
 
Persons wishing to enter Denmark to travel on to other countries must meet the requirements for qualifying as a worthy purpose. Persons who are not Danish citizens and who do not have Danish residence will not be permitted to travel from Sweden into Denmark for the purpose of travelling to a third country unless the trip has a worthy purpose, e.g. returning to one’s home country, participation in a funeral, or treatment at a hospital.

Foreign nationals exhibiting visible signs of illness, e.g. cough, fever, etc., will not be permitted to enter Denmark for any purpose.
 
According to the circumstances, foreign nationals will be asked to provide evidence of the worthy purpose.

 
Yes, travellers and airline personnel can transit through Danish airports. The transit must be completed without undue delay. Persons wishing to enter Denmark during their layover in transit to their home countries must meet the requirements for qualifying as a worthy purpose
Travels to other countries
As of 13 March 2020, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Denmark advises against all travel for any reason to any destination outside of Denmark. This advice will remain in effect at least until 10 May 2020.

The Ministry of Foreign Affairs advises against all non-essential travel worldwide. Therefore, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs has frozen its travel advice, preliminarily until 10 May 2020.

At this stage, it is too early to say whether and to what extent the travel advice will change after 10 May as it depends on containment of the coronavirus outbreak. The Ministry of Foreign Affairs is continuously evaluating the situation and will update its travel advice accordingly.

Should you choose to travel, you must be aware of the risks of such travel. Your destination may be hard to reach, and local authorities may impose restrictions with very short notice. .These restrictions may include forced quarantines, cancellation of flights, border closures, etc. The Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Denmark cannot guarantee against sudden changes in the approach taken by individual countries, including the cancellation of flights. There is furthermore a risk that you might – unintentionally - contribute to spreading the virus.

The Ministry of Foreign Affairs advises you to contact your insurance provider before potential departure. The Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Denmark also recommends that you consider your personal safety and that you stay up to date on developments via local authorities, news media, and your travel agency.

Find up to date information on travel destinations at the websites of the Danish embassies. See more at www.um.dk.

Danes and Danish residents abroad
Yes. The Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Denmark advises Danes and people residing in Denmark currently travelling abroad to return home as soon as possible and in close dialogue with their travel agency, airline or insurance company. With the many restrictions being implemented in Denmark and abroad, it may prove difficult to find a means of returning to Denmark within a short time. We are also seeing an increasing number of air routes being closed or cancelled, which further adds to the difficulty of returning to Denmark

 

The Danish authorities now advise against all non-essential travel worldwide.

 

If you are presently abroad, the new travel advice means that: 

  • The Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Denmark advises you to return home as soon as possible, and in close dialogue with your travel agency, airline or insurance company.
  • You must contact your travel agency and insurance company if you have questions about how you can return home.
  • If outbound travel from the country is not possible, you can contact the Danish Embassy and Consulate. You can also contact the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Denmark Global Help Desk 24 hours a day (bbb@um.dk or +4533921112).
  • You should check the local restrictions in the country where you are located. 
  • You are encouraged to register on “Danskerlisten” – the list of Danes abroad – via www.um.dk or using the Rejseklar app. Danskerlisten is the fastest way for the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Denmark to send you information about the country in which you are located. 

 

This change does not mean that the Danish borders are being closed for entry by Danes or Danish residents returning from holiday or other stays abroad. 

 

The Ministry of Foreign Affairs strongly advise anyone returning from private travel – or who has returned within the past two weeks – to stay home for 14 days after returning from travel abroad. The advice applies to both Danes and foreigners who enter Denmark. 

 

Should you choose to continue your travels, you must be aware of the risks of such travel. The local restrictions may change with very short notice. There is a risk that countries will be quarantining travellers upon arrival, or a risk that you might contribute to spreading the virus.

 

It is recommended that you regularly check the websites of the Danish embassies and remember to read the recommendations of the Danish Health Authority.

 

Employees performing critical functions in the health care, elderly care and general care sectors or work with vulnerable people, should contact their employer in order to agree on the terms of their return to work. This includes whether the employee may be assessed for infection with COVID-19 and should therefore make a concrete and individual assessment of whether the person can start work immediately after returning home.

 

 

Danes residing abroad are advised to stay where they are and observe the instructions of the local authorities.
Visa and work or residence permits

Due to the restrictions on entry into Denmark, it is temporarily not possible to apply for a visa to Denmark.

 

This means that you cannot fill in an application or hand in your application at a Visa Application Center (VFS).

 

Applicants who have handed in their visa application prior to 20 March will have their case processed normally.

 

In urgent cases where an applicant has to travel to Denmark before 10 May AND has a worthy purpose for entering Denmark (See question “what are worthy purposes?”), the applicant can contact the relevant Danish mission (see Find us abroad) and enquire whether it is possible to hand in an application at the Danish mission. 

It is not possible to modify the issued visa, so you must apply for a new visa for the time when you wish to travel. However, due to the restrictions on entry into Denmark, it is temporarily not possible to apply for a visa to Denmark (See question “Can I still apply for a visa to Denmark?”)
If you have applied for a visa before 20 March, your application will be submitted to the Danish Immigration Service (Udlændingestyrelsen) for consideration. This means that the case processing times will be prolonged. You can choose to withdraw your application. To do so please contact the relevant Danish mission.

Applicants who applied for a visa to Denmark and who did not yet receive a decision can choose to withdraw their application. Normally, the visa application fee will not be refunded if the processing of the visa application has started. Due to the implemented entry restrictions, it has been decided to make an exception to this rule. All applicants who wish to withdraw their application and who handed in the application before 14 March will get a refund of the visa application fee.

 

Travelers who have already been granted a visa will not be able to get a refund of the visa application fee, even if the entry restrictions prevent them from entering Denmark.

 
Entry into Denmark has been restricted, which means that you can only enter Denmark if you have a valid visa AND a worthy purpose (‘anerkendelsesværdigt formål’) for the visit. Worthy purposes includes travellers who are either parents or primary caretakers of minors residing in Denmark (e.g. foster parents), visits to critically ill family members, persons who are in the process of a medical treatment in Denmark, persons who are attending a funeral in Denmark, and persons who will be part of a court case in Denmark (See question “what are worthy purposes?”).

Foreign nationals who have already obtained a residence permit under the Working Holiday scheme will still be able to enter Denmark. However, contact the Police Hotline to enquire whether your entry into Denmark on a Working Holiday visa constitutes a worthy purpose on: 7020 6044  

The Minister for Immigration and Integration has decided to temporarily suspend all Working Holiday agreements. This means that the Danish Agency for International Recruitment and Integration (SIRI) until further notice will stop issuing new residence permits for Working Holiday.

 

Read more about the suspension

Yes, and if you already hold a valid work or residence permit you can enter Denmark despite the entry restrictions

It is currently not possible to apply for an extension of a short stay visa in Denmark because the Danish Immigration Service’s Citizen Service is closed for visitors. If you have not been able to leave Denmark in time due to the worldwide coronavirus (COVID-19) you will get a letter stating that your departure date for leaving Denmark has been postponed for 60 days, counted from the date when the letter is issued. You will receive the letter from the police at the airport when you leave Denmark. Please visit New to Denmark’s website for more information.

 

It is still possible to contact the Danish Immigration Service, as well as the Agency of International Recruitment and Integration

 

With regards to extensions of residence permits handled by the Danish Immigration Service (cases of family reunification, residence permit as religious worker and residence permit based on previous Danish citizenship, Danish heritage or affiliation with Danish minority), please visit New to Denmark’s New to Denmark's website

 

With regards to extensions of residence permits handled by the Danish Agency for International Recruitment and Integration (cases of work permits, Working Holiday and residence under the EU regulations etc.), please visit New to Denmark’s website

 

For businesses
The Danish Business Authority hotline can answer questions about the precautions your company can take in connection with coronavirus. Tel: (+45) 72 20 00 34. Opening hours are daily from 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. CET (Friday 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. CET).

The German authorities have announced that Polish citizens can transit through Germany to Denmark and Poland for employment purposes. Travelers will need to be able to document employment in a regular manner. 

 

Polish citizens can travel to Denmark from Germany, if they have a worthy purpose for the journey. You can find further information on worthy purpose on this page.  

 
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